KECK INSTITUTE FOR SPACE STUDIES

       

Earth Sciences

Earth Science Earth Science

Programs


Next-Generation Approach for Detecting Climate-Carbon Feedbacks: Space-Based Integration of Carbonyl Sulfide (OCS), CO2, and Solar Induced Fluorescence (SIF)

The KISS workshop will be used to articulate a vision for coupled analysis of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) retrievals with satellite-based SIF and CO2 data, providing a new window into the carbon cycle and a revolution in our understanding of carbon-climate feedbacks and crop monitoring. Key workshop goals will be to move beyond the disparate analyses of OCS, SIF, and CO2, and create a platform for a common language, basic understanding of opportunities and uncertainties, shared data sets, and roadmap for an integrated space-based OCS-SIF-CO2 mission.
 



Exploring New Multi-Instrument Approaches to Observing Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Carbon Cycle from Space

The focus of this study is exploring new multi-instrument approaches to doing ecosystem science from space. We will frame this more general topic around the amazing opportunity that in a few years, we could have simultaneous observations of ecosystem structure, functioning, and composition from the ISS.
 



Gazing at the Solar System: Capturing the Evolution of Dunes, Faults, Volcanoes and Ice from Space

The goals of this study program are to develop the science that can be teased out of spaceborne gazing, specific types of targets and applications, the resolution and spectral bands needed to achieve the science, and possible instrument configurations for future missions.
 



Airships: A New Horizon for Science

This study aimis to identify science observational/experimental projects that are uniquely addressed by airship vehicles, and determine which of these science goals could be simultaneously accommodated in one platform.
 



The Sleeping Giant: Measuring Ocean Ice Interactions in Antarctica

This study will explore integrated field programs and numerical studies to describe high frequency variability at the ocean-ice interface in Antarctica.
 



Satellites to the Seafloor: Autonomous Science to Forge a Breakthrough in Quantifying the Global Ocean Carbon Budget

This study brings together scientists, who understand the imperative and scope of quantifying the global carbon budget, with technologists, who may be able to glimpse a possible way of solving it.
 



New Methods to Measure Photosynthesis from Space

The focus of this study is on a newly developed capacity to monitor chlorophyll fluorescence from terrestrial vegetation by satellite.
 



Small Satellites: A Revolution in Space Science

This study will bring together space scientists, technologists, and mission designers across two workshops to conceive novel scientific observations and to resolve the technical roadblocks for new observations that are inaccessible to traditional spacecraft systems, yet enabled by small satellite systems.
 



Monitoring of Geoengineering Effects and their Natural and Anthropogenic Analogues

This study focuses primarily on examination of concepts based on managing solar radiation into the climate systems.
 



Innovative Satellite Observations to Characterize the Cloudy Boundary Layer

This study will identify the technology developments required to obtain the space-borne measurements needed to significantly reduce this key climate projection uncertainty.
 



Monitoring Earth Surface Changes from Space

The objective of this study is to imagine remote sensing systems and processing techniques that will produce observations (Optical, SAR, or Lidar) with optimal spatial and temporal coverage, ground resolution and registration accuracy to measure deformation and surface changes that are relevant to investigate the internal and external dynamics of Earth and potentially other planets.
 



Quantifying the Sources and Sinks of Atmospheric CO2

The participants reviewed the potential of spacebased and sub‐orbital observational and modeling approaches to monitor anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the presence of much larger natural fluxes from the exchange of CO2 between the land, atmosphere, and ocean.
 



Climate Feedbacks and Future Remote Sensing Observation

The goals of this study is to bring together scientists from different branches of the climate research community to address key problems in the physics of climate feedbacks.
 


Lectures

Climate Change Impact on Past Civilizations: Lessons from Space Data and Archaeology

May 24th, 2016
Speaker: Ronald G. Blom, Ph. D. - Principal Scientist (Retired), Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Fire and Ice: Exploring Volcanoes on Earth and the Solar System

May 14, 2015
Speaker: Rosaly M. C. Lopes, Senior Research Scientist, Manager for Planetary Science NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Optical Remote Sensing of Earth and Planetary Surfaces

June 17, 2014
Speaker: Dr. Jean-Philippe Avouac, Earle C. Anthony Professor of Geology, Caltech



Monitoring Future Climate Treaties

March 2, 2010
Panel Moderator: Paul Wennberg, Caltech

The MSU Debate, Climate Auditing, and the Freedom of Information Act

September 3, 2009
Speaker: Dr. Ben Santer, Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison Lawrence Livermore National Lab

Co-Sponsored Events

Using Satellite Observations to Advance Climate Models (2017), (2016), (2015), (2012), (2011)